Stephan Druskat

By Ilektra Christidi, UCL and Stephan Druskat, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. During the Third RSE conference in September, an international session was held in order to tap into the experiences and ideas of emerging RSE communities and associations around the world. The goal was to hold a more open discussion on the initiatives to be taken to coordinate this activity at an international level, capitalising on the RSE International Leaders workshop earlier this year.
By Jurriaan H. Spaaks, Stefan Verhoeven, Tom Klaver, Jason Maassen, (Netherlands eScience Center) and Stephan Druskat (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin). This post was originally published at the NL eScience Center blog. The Netherlands eScience Center currently employs about 50 Research Software Engineers who work side-by-side with domain scientists to address technological challenges that need to be overcome in order to answer the research questions.
By Stephan Druskat, Daniel S. Katz, David Klein, Mark Santcroos, Tobias Schlauch, Liz Sexton-Kennedy, and Anthony Truskinger. Like the behemoth cruise ship leaving the harbour of Amsterdam that overshadowed our discussion table at WSSSPE 6.1, credit for software is a slowly moving target, and it’s a non-trivial task to ensure that the right people get due credit. In this blog post, we aim to review the current state of practice in terms of credit for research software. We also attempt to summarise recent developments and outline a more ideal state of affairs.
By Raniere Silva, Software Sustainability Institute, Stephan Druskat, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. ConfOA is the Brazil-Portugal Conference about Open Access and the 9th edition was hosted in Lisbon, Portugal between the 2nd and 4th October 2018. Although the conference only has open access in its name, it is the place to talk about the broader concept of open science with many stakeholders.
By Stephan Druskat, Jurriaan H. Spaaks, Netherlands eScience Center, and Alexander Struck. In order to enable attribution and credit for Research Software Engineers, and other developers of and contributors to research software, software must be made citable, and must be cited. One of the obstacles for correct and comprehensive software citation is the lack, or suboptimal discoverability, of relevant metadata. While, for instance, papers provide their metadata quite obviously (i.e., title, authors, containing publication, publication date, etc.), software hardly ever does.
The citation of research software has a number of purposes, most importantly attribution and credit, but also the provision of impact metrics for funding proposals, job interviews, etc.

By Stephan Druskat (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)

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