Life sciences

The culmination of two years’ work by the Pistoia Alliance project team, the UXLS Toolkit provides material on UX education, methods and use cases compiled especially for life scientists. It is pitched at busy UX specialists, in silico analysts and bench scientists in an easily, accessible self-help style who all need better software. UX for Life Sciences Toolkit was created to enable businesses to adopt UX principles and methods as they develop scientific software.

By Justin Clark-Casey, Research Software Engineer, Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge.

By Alexander Hay, the Institute’s Policy & Communications Consultant, talking with Andreas Hegar, CGAT.

This article is part of our series: Breaking Software Barriers, in which Alexander Hay investigates how our Research Software Group has helped projects improve their research software. If you would like help with your software, let us know.

Life Sciences often suffer from a lack of programming skills. This isn’t always a problem – you don’t need to know how to code in order to gauge the diurnal eating habits of squirrels,…

By Derek Groen, Research Associate at University College London.

This September, Joanna Lewis and I organised a Paper Hackathon event in Flore, Northamptonshire, with support from both the Software Sustainability Institute and 2020 Science.

Our highly ambitious goal was to write a scientific draft paper over the course of two and a half days within a highly informal setting. Did we manage to accomplish that? In many of the projects we did!

The University of Oxford's Department of Computer Science has announced a new vacancy for a programmer to work on a major life sciences project.

The successful applicant will work on the Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment, or Chaste, a general purpose package aimed at solving complex problems in biology and physiology research.

Their duties will include finding the best way to help external users both install the software and provide feedback more easily.

A new collection of visualisation tools for representing biological information is now available thanks to TGAC, EMBL-EBI and F1000Research.

TGAC’s BioJS collection, published today by the journal F1000Research, comprises 14 open-access articles detailing the functionality, design, implementation and potential applications for a suite of open-source, JavaScript software components contributed by developers all over the world. The collection marks a significant step towards improving the way scientists can visualise biological data.

Data visualisations help…

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