Best practice

By Patrick McCann, Rachel Ainsworth, Jason M. Gates, Jakob S. Jørgensen, Diego Alonso-Álvarez, and Cerys Lewis. This post is part of the CW19 speed blog posts series. What are the challenges? For many researchers, the development of software is a means to an end—a chore that is necessary to allow them to get on with the real work of conducting research and publishing papers. They may not see themselves as programmers or recognise the code that they write as being software. Their supervisors or senior colleagues may not see the value of devoting perceived extra effort to following good…
By Becky Arnold, University of Sheffield. On the 30th of January 2019, Christopher Woods, an EPSRC fellow at the Advanced Computing Research Centre at the University of Bristol gave a talk on "How to Design and Engineer Good Code for Research" at the University of Sheffield.

By Becky Arnold, University of Sheffield

This is part of a series of talks on good coding practice and related topics Becky Arnold has organised as part of her Fellowship plan.  

Software Sustainability Institute fellow Becky Arnold is arranging a series of talks on good coding practice and related topics. The first session will take place on the 2nd May at Sheffield University.

By Stuart Grieve, Research Software Developer, University College London, Eike Mueller, Lecturer in Scientific Computing, University of Bath, Alexander Morley

By Adam Tomkins (Chair), University of Sheffield, James Grant, University of Bath, Alexander Morley,

By Sammie Buzzard, University College London; Martin Donnelly, University of Edinburgh.

By Damien Irving,  climate scientist

This post was originally published on the Dr Climate blog.

By Raniere Silva, Software Sustainability Institute, David Pérez-Suárez, University College London.

Coding is often seen as a tool to do science, rather than an intrinsic part of the scientific process. This often results in scientific code that is written in a rather unscientific way.
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