Testing

By Becky Arnold, University of Sheffield. On the 30th of January 2019, Christopher Woods, an EPSRC fellow at the Advanced Computing Research Centre at the University of Bristol gave a talk on "How to Design and Engineer Good Code for Research" at the University of Sheffield.

By Andrew Walker, Sam Mangham, Robert Maftei, Adam Jackson, Becky Arnold, Sammie Buzzards, and Eike Mueller

This post is part of the Collaborations Workshops 2018 speed blogging series.

By Steve Crouch.

Why and how to test your code?

By Mike Jackson, Software Architect.

In August I completed an open call project with Trung Dong Huynh, Luc Moreau and Danius Michaelides of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. As part of their research into provenance, they have developed the Southampton Provenance Tool Suite, a suite of software, libraries and services to capture, store and visualise provenance compliant with the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) PROV standards. I developed a test framework in Python, which tests Provenance Tool Suite toolkits and services operating…

By Steve Crouch, Research Software Group lead

With Autumn just around the corner, September has seen some exciting activities within the Institute’s Research Software Group. We’re helping improve the testing of Grid accounting software used by the Large Hadron Collider, we’re assessing the sustainability of a web service that supports greater fitness, and we’ve had a record number of applications into the recently closed Open Call!

By Mike Jackson, Software Architect.

In May I started a consultancy project with Trung Dong Huynh, Luc Moreau and Danius Michaelides of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. As part of their research into provenance, they have developed the Southampton Provenance Tool Suite, a suite of software, libraries and services to capture, store and visualise provenance compliant with the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) PROV standards. The goal of the consultancy was to develop an infrastructure, which systematically checks convertibility and round-trip…

By Mike Jackson, Software Architect.

Automated tests provide a way to check that research software both produces scientifically-valid results and that it continues to do so if it is extended, refactored, optimised or tidied. Yet one challenge that can face researchers, especially those with large, legacy codes, is this - where to start?

The prospect of having to write dozens of unit tests can be off-putting at the best of times, let alone if one has a data to analyse, a paper to write or a conference to prepare for. Our new guide on Adopting automated testing…

By Mike Jackson, Software Architect.

As part of a recent open call collaboration with the Distance project at the University of St. Andrews, I was asked about open source tools to automatically test GUI-based applications on Windows.

By coincidence, an EPCC colleague had recently asked me the same question. So, I hit Google and Wikipedia, tracked down some candidates and decided to try the free open source AutoHotKey toolkit. In this blog post, I describe my experiences with this "scriptable desktop automation" tool.

Freeware and open source GUI test tools…

By Mike Jackson, Software Architect.

As part of our open call collaboration with TPLS I was to develop a suite of unit tests. TPLS is written in FORTRAN and while there are de-facto standard unit test frameworks for Java (JUnit) or Python (PyUnit), for FORTRAN there are none. In this blog post I look at the test frameworks that are available for FORTRAN, compare two, FRUIT and pFUnit, and explain why I opted to use FRUIT for TPLS.

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